babylovemelightsoutxoxo:

Hello Diamond Dan

babylovemelightsoutxoxo:

Hello Diamond Dan

allcreatures:

Picture: Petr Banny/Solent News (via Pictures of the day: 15 August 2014 - Telegraph)

allcreatures:

Picture: Petr Banny/Solent News (via Pictures of the day: 15 August 2014 - Telegraph)


Facebook Update Marsel van Oosten, 500px.com

Facebook Update
Marsel van Oosten, 500px.com

(Source: tjpytheas, via allcreatures)

allcreatures:


This group of horses found themselves stranded on a tiny island of land after the River Dulnain in Inverness-shire, Scotland burst its banks. The four animals were spotted perched on their small hump of grass surrounded by water by local photographer Mark Hamblin. According to Mark the horses were left stranded all day but appeared perfectly content as they cropped the grass on their small island. And, as the water levels gradually decreased and their grassy sanctuary grew larger, the horses were given access to even more food. As the water levels were dropping, and the horses were not in immediate danger, the decision was made not to launch a rescue mission but to wait until the horses were able to make their own way to freedom.

Picture: Mark Hamblin/REX (via Pictures of the day: 12 August 2014 - Telegraph)

allcreatures:

This group of horses found themselves stranded on a tiny island of land after the River Dulnain in Inverness-shire, Scotland burst its banks. The four animals were spotted perched on their small hump of grass surrounded by water by local photographer Mark Hamblin. According to Mark the horses were left stranded all day but appeared perfectly content as they cropped the grass on their small island. And, as the water levels gradually decreased and their grassy sanctuary grew larger, the horses were given access to even more food. As the water levels were dropping, and the horses were not in immediate danger, the decision was made not to launch a rescue mission but to wait until the horses were able to make their own way to freedom.

Picture: Mark Hamblin/REX (via Pictures of the day: 12 August 2014 - Telegraph)

allcreatures:


A Sunda flying lemur hangs from a tree branch by holding on with its arms and legs as he enjoys a rest. It uses its body like a hammock and relaxes by resting its head on the edge of its back. The bat-like creature - pictured snoozing in Sekura in Indonesia - slept for 15 minutes before it woke up to manoeuvre along the branch.

Picture: Hendy MP/Solent News (via Pictures of the day: 12 August 2014 - Telegraph)

allcreatures:

A Sunda flying lemur hangs from a tree branch by holding on with its arms and legs as he enjoys a rest. It uses its body like a hammock and relaxes by resting its head on the edge of its back. The bat-like creature - pictured snoozing in Sekura in Indonesia - slept for 15 minutes before it woke up to manoeuvre along the branch.

Picture: Hendy MP/Solent News (via Pictures of the day: 12 August 2014 - Telegraph)

"

Researchers at Oxford University’s Institute of Genetics and Molecular Medicine have developed software that can detect the risk for genetic disorders in children, such as Down and Treacher Collins syndromes, just by scanning old photographs of their family members.

More than 7,000 rare genetic disorders are known, and although each is unique, there is at least one common thread: 30 to 40 percent of them involve detectable abnormalities in the cranium and face. The Oxford project, called Clinical Face Phenotype Space, builds on this knowledge, melding machine learning and computer technology to scan family photos and cross-reference them with a database built from images of people with known genetic disorders.

The Clinical Face Phenotype Space recognizes faces in photographs regardless of a person’s pose or facial expression, image quality, lighting variations or other factors.

"

Scanning Family Photos Can Reveal Rare Genetic Disorders (via newsweek)

(via newsweek)

"To get a gun in Japan, first, you have to attend an all-day class and pass a written test, which are held only once per month. You also must take and pass a shooting range class. Then, head over to a hospital for a mental test and drug test (Japan is unusual in that potential gun owners must affirmatively prove their mental fitness), which you’ll file with the police. Finally, pass a rigorous background check for any criminal record or association with criminal or extremist groups, and you will be the proud new owner of your shotgun or air rifle. Just don’t forget to provide police with documentation on the specific location of the gun in your home, as well as the ammo, both of which must be locked and stored separately. And remember to have the police inspect the gun once per year and to re-take the class and exam every three years."

A Land Without Guns: How Japan Has Virtually Eliminated Shooting Deaths (via buttension)

see, that’s gun control
you don’t take away a person’s right to bear arms
you take away a person’s ability to abuse their arms
i mean it’s high maintenance but i really think it’d be worth it if it saves lives  

(via vintagedressesandavocados)

Japanese citizens can own guns — once they’ve proven they know how to responsibly use them and store them. Once they’ve proven they’re fit to own a gun. For some reason, this completely reasonable notion is considered ~TYRannY~ ~affront to LIBERTY~ in the United States.

(via thebicker)

(Source: lauraolin, via thebicker)

aethracaelis:

adreamerofimpossibledreams:

WAKE UP WORLD #YesAllWomen

That steak analogy is my favorite,

(Source: fallingslowly11211, via thebicker)

jkottke:

A harrowing piece by novelist Helen DeWitt about being stalked by her neighbor.

E turned up next morning at six because his fire had gone out. I said I had to go for my walk. He went home. When I got back I found a pane of glass on the dresser; there was a gap in its normal home in the side…